Archives for posts with tag: Jack

Hello again. I am back from Williamsburg, Virginia.

First of all, while I was vacationing at America’s Historic Triangle in Virginia (consisting of Jamestown, Williamsburg and Yorktown), I have conceived this idea of writing a big, epic fantasy novel based on and inspired by the cartoon Samurai Jack, one that would take Samurai Jack’s entire childhood, training around the world, and return home as an adult in the hopes of freeing his enslaved people and vanquishing the demon Aku before Aku himself sends Jack spiraling into the future that is Aku, recast it in modern literary prose language (and just like T.H. White have done with his masterful epic retelling of Arthurian legend, The Once and Future King), and retell Samurai Jack’s childhood, training and return home to try and free his enslaved people before Aku banishes the warrior into the future that is Aku for a whole new generation.

The title of my planned epic novel:

The Once And Future Samurai



And the ‘Once And Future Samurai‘ of the title and in question shall be…


This child:




Young Jack, to be exact!

My intention for The Once and Future Samurai is to track the epic life’s journey of Samurai Jack from his boyhood through his training ‘round the world among all manners of warriors and heroes to his return home as an adult to try to free his enslaved people and destroy Aku the Shogun of Sorrow, and ending at the point where Jack is about to strike the final death blow against Aku, at the point just before Aku tore open a portal in time and flung him into the future.

Anyway, I will begin my epic novel, The Once and Future Samurai, shortly after Samurai Jack was born at the end of The Birth of Evil Part II, when his father, the Emperor of Japan/Shanghara gather together the great leaders of the world’s many peoples where, in a great United Nations-type council meeting, they all devise a plan that will prepare The Emperor’s Son, the Once and Future Samurai of the title, for the ultimate battle against the ultimate evil that is Aku, in case Aku ever returns or gets his jailbreak.

Hopefully, in fleshing out the details in Samurai Jack’s childhood before Aku’s jailbreak, I hope to include…

Hmm. Let’s see…



Oh! I Know!

His playing with the crickets and this girl:




His encounter with none other than Lone Wolf and Cub:




The lessons he learned from his father and mother, The Emperor and Empress of Japan/Shanghara:




The time where he plays with his favorite ball…














…and his thwarting of the three bullies who stole Young Jack’s ball:




All was happy for Young Jack and his Japanese/Shangharan empire, until one day, when a solar eclipse brought about Aku’s jailbreak, so he can “smite the world like I had in days long past”.

And guess what will Aku bring with him in addition to his strange powers, don’t ya?

An army of swarthy barbarians from Astronoma, a land to the north of Shanghara, and their ruthless leader, Nam’Krad The Astronomean (which is backwards for Dexter’s Laboratory’s Mandark), who, offended by not being invited to the great United Nations-like council meeting held by Samurai Jack’s father, The Emperor, swears to conquer and invade Japan/Shanghara and the surrounding world in the name of Aku.

The Emperor’s soldiers fought bravely against Aku and Nam’Krad’s invading Astronomean forces but they cannot defeat Aku’s strange powers, not to mention, the explosives employed by the barbaric Astronomean invaders. And Aku also captured the Emperor before he could reached his magic sword.

But one hope remained.

The Emperor’s wife took the sword and Young Jack with her and left Japan/Shanghara to get away from the ensuing violence.

She hid the sword with a secret sect of monks in the cold recesses of Taipania and sent Young Jack ‘round the world to be trained as a samurai warrior among all manner of warriors and heroes from different cultures.




Remember, Jack wears a special symbol around his neck that identifies him as the son of the Emperor of Japan/Shanghara, and somebody to be trusted, too!




On a Japanese/Shangharan Junk, he learns Navigation/Astronomy:




In the land of Elsharzar/Arabia, he learns horseback riding:




In Harlorleanea/Africa, he learns stick fighting from the Zuli people:




In Azigoria/Egypt, he learns how to read, write and translate hieroglyphics:




In Athenodor/Greece, he learns wrestling:




In the forests of Avaland/England, he learns archery from Locksley/Robin Hood, a Robin Hood-like man who is also a friend of Oliver, The Young Captain of Avaland:




In Vargland/Scandinavia, he learns how to sail the high seas from the Varg People of the Northern Sea/Vikings:




In Nevskia/Russia, He learns how to throw an axe at a target:




In Tenjaland/Mongolia, he learns from the Ten’Jai/Mongols how to throw spears:




And in Taipania/China, he learns martial arts from the Shaolin Monks:




In all his travels, Jack grew from a boy into a man.




He may have learned the basic skills of a samurai warrior, but he learned some extra skills as well. All the extra training helped Samurai Jack to become a well-rounded warrior—the only kind of warrior able to take on Aku.

After claiming the sword from his mother, he gathers a coalition of Avalish and Taipanean soldiers as well as the last surviving Shangharan samurai armies and together, they went to the shores of Shanghara and ride to glory against the Astronomeans led by Lord Nam’Krad, with Jack flying the Shangharan standard from a Taipanean Junk.

After losing Captain Oliver to Nam’Krad, after defeating Nam’Krad and the Astronomeans, after subduing Aku’s taskmasters, and after freeing the Emperor of Japan/Shanghara and his people, he challenged Aku:




At the end of my novel, The Once And Future Samurai, Aku and Jack fought a spectacular battle.

And like I said, I shall end my epic novel/retelling of Samurai Jack’s boyhood and training at the very point Jack is about to destroy the demon with one last killin’ blow from his sword, at the very point just before Aku conjured up a time portal that sent Jack spiraling far into the future that is Aku:




Aku: You might have beat me now, but I will destroy you in the future.

Jack: There is no future for you, Aku.

Aku: I disagree.

Like I said, Samurai Jack, to me, is, in question, the Once and Future Samurai refer to in the title of my book, and always will be, would he?




Anyway, even as The Once and Future Samurai will chronicle the boyhood of Samurai Jack, his training around the world, and his return home to challenge Aku and his allies, the Astronomeans, and ending immediately before Aku flung him into the future that is Aku, one of the central themes in The Once and Future Samurai, is going to be an exploration of human nature.

For even though I shall admit the source of my book is the cartoon Samurai Jack (which is my all-time favorite) by Genndy Tartakovsky, I shall reinterpret the events taking Jack from his childhood through his training to his return home to challenge Aku before he sent him to the future, and I shall fill them all with renewed meaning even for a world waiting for dark precarious time to improve (especially in the post-9/11 age and especially in the Great Recession) and especially for a whole new generation of fans of Genndy Tartakovsky and Samurai Jack.

And I shall give the characters in The Once and Future Samurai motivations or traits more complex or even contradictory to those on Samurai Jack the cartoon show.

And I would like to allow Genndy Tartakovsky himself to have a cameo appearance at the end of my Once And Future Samurai book. I will also like to treat the historical characters as mythological or fictional within the world I create for the Once and Future Samurai.

I shall also incorporate not only anachronistic allusions to the past (i.e., dinosaurs, etc.), but also those to events in more recent times (like 9/11, the actions of James Holmes, Adam Lanza or Elliot Rodgers, etc.).

Just like in T.H. White’s The Once And Future King, would it?




Gee, Talk about ‘anachronism stew’ over here! HA HA HA HA!

Anyway, what would you think of The Once And Future Samurai, my epic novel/retelling/chronicle of Samurai Jack’s childhood, training and return home to free his enslaved people and challenge Aku before the demon sends the Samurai into the future? And what would you think of all the things I wanted to incorporate into The Once And Future Samurai?




Speaking of heroes and heroines whose origins are from farther east, I would like to share with you all this Asian heroine and this Asian hero, respectively:



Mulan comforts Mushu at the end of her movie




A) Mulan, or she who is as mighty, brave and noble as a warrior, as she is young, fair and beautiful as a maiden, and whose story—a story that is as much well known familiar to the peoples of all Asia (including the people of her indigenous China) as the story of Cinderella is much well known and familiar to the peoples of Europe and the United States—provided the basis for a hand drawn Disney movie from 16 years ago.










B) Samurai Jack, or he who is my kind of guy, a time-displaced warrior swordsman prince of Medieval Japan, my cartoon hero, my favorite cartoon samurai as well as my main Asian man (if only AVATAR’s Jake Sully (Sam Worthington) counts as ‘my main blue man’) and he who wants to go back to his own time and place so he can do the killin’ blow to the evil shape shifting demon wizard Aku, the Master of Masters, Deliverer of Darkness, and Shogun or Sorrow, or whatever Aku’s self-proclaimed titles are…

Anyway, speaking of Samurai Jack:



When he was a little kid, when Aku got his jailbreak thanks to an eclipse, he got send around the world by his mom and dad to train among all manner of warriors. And when he return to his home as a fully grown adult, after a battle between him and Aku’s taskmasters, Jack challenges Aku to an epic duel in the hope of undoing the damage Aku has wrought upon his home, but that was before Aku gave Jack the boot to the future that is AKU!

If we will never, ever possibly get a proper ending for Samurai Jack from Genndy Tartakovsky himself, then too bad, but just like Jack who swears to god not to give up on his quest to find the time portal and go back to his own time and place so he can finally do the killin’ blow to Aku and his future world, Genndy Tartakovsky will never, EVER give up on a big screen Samurai Jack movie that will possibly feature the long promised proper ending to the show.

And if the big screen Samurai Jack feature film project might ever become a reality, an actuality as well as a fact, I certainly  hope that even in its ultimate form, the big screen Samurai Jack feature film project might end up not only succeeding where non-Disney 2D hand drawn animated things such as The Powerpuff Girls Movie failed to do, but also fulfilling a rare, never-before-done wish for any animated movie of the non-Disney variety and especially of the hand-drawn variety: becoming hopefully one of the most popular and successful movies of all time (be it live action, animated, Disney, Not-Disney, Hand Drawn, CGI, or otherwise) , let alone drawing record crowds and hopefully eclipsing the likes of The Lion King, the Shrek and Toy Story films, or even Disney’s Frozen or so as one of, or if not, the animation industry’s biggest and most phenomenal financial success or so.

But for now, I am just kidding.

Anyway, as for the legendary Chinese female warrior Mulan…

The Two Destinys of Mulan


Most Americans will forever remember Mulan through Disney’s interpretation of her story.

I, for one, did not think a woman like—and such as—the legendary Mulan—could be THAT mighty, brave and noble as a warrior when she is THAT young, fair and beautiful as a maiden…

Again, I never, ever think a woman—especially one from farther east like the aforementioned Mulan—could be as mighty, brave and noble as a warrior as she is young, fair and beautiful as a maiden.

That, again, is just my two cents.

One more thing.

I would also quote from the Emperor of China whom Mulan saves from the villainous Shan-Yu and the Mongols (or Huns, as the Disney movie refer to them):

“I’ve heard a great deal about you, Fa Mulan.

You stole your father’s armor,

ran away from home,

impersonated a soldier,

deceived your commanding officer,

dishonored the Chinese Army,

destroyed my palace,

and you have saved us all.”

Anyway, I am asking you all this:

What are the differences between Mulan and Samurai Jack? And what are the similarities, or comparison and contrast , if you will, between Samurai Jack and Mulan?

Hey ladies and gentlemen! Guess what I found?
There are some preliminary sketches done for my most favorite action cartoon of all time—Samurai Jack:






















There are also storyboards for Aku’s opening attack on Jack’s village at the beginning of Samurai Jack:























And last but not least, 10 model sheets/episode/character designs from the first half hour part of the premiere movie:





















And where did I found them, you may ask?

Well, I have found them last night at the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine archive cache for the Samurai Jack page at Cartoon’s now-defunct Department of Cartoons webpage, of course.

And someday, folks, I am going to be famous for my love of cartoons, especially the work of Genndy Tartakovsky like Samurai Jack. And someday, my fame and fortune will grow to worldwide/international proportions on account and strength of what I’m hoping for the most complete Samurai Jack behind-the-scenes art collection ever compiled and assembled, and by no means imaginable—one which will take the form of a multi-volume series of lavishly illustrated Samurai Jack coffee-table art books (in print, digital interactive ebook or both forms) or a major traveling art gallery show exhibit showcase, perhaps—The Art of Samurai Jack: An Epic Behind-The-Scenes Celebration of Genndy Tartakovsky’s epic action cartoon series Samurai Jack, no less.

So, what do you think?